Riding during COVID-19 Outbreak

#RIDEITOUT

#LIFEBYBIKE

#RIDESOLO

UPDATES

June 1st, 2020

The San Diego County Bicycle Coalition is committed to supporting cyclists through this challenging time. Bike riding is a great way to bolster your physical and mental health and daily exercise is allowed during lock down. Please follow the county guidelines, wear a mask when appropriate, do not go on social rides, and if you find yourself around other road users, keep your distance. We recognize that an invisible enemy is hard to fathom. When traveling at speeds, droplets have a much greater range, and 6 feet is not enough space between riders. Ride solo, or with your housemates, to stop the spread of this virus.
 
As businesses slowly re-open, we encourage you all to keep up your biking habits and find ways to making more trips by bikes. More cyclists means safer roads for everyone! Please wear a helmet, follow the rules of the road and ride predictably. If you choose to ride, please do so respectfully.
 
The CDC has published suggestions for how to reopen office spaces. Thanks to the work of bicycle advocates, bicycling to work has been included as a suggested way to stay healthy and safe during this time!
 
Visit this website for more details about biking during this time.

BICYCLE SHOPS ARE ESSENTIAL BUSINESSES

Check out the current map of bike shops open for business in San Diego County.

RIDE TIPS

Bicycling recommendations made by Dr. Michael Roshon during USA Cycling webinar on March 17, 2020:

  • First and foremost: if you think you’ve been exposed, self-quarantine. Including being outdoors. Do not ride outside. 
  • Do not go for group rides with people who live outside of your household. Only ride with people you are already staying at home with and, when passing someone else on the road or trail, leave as much space as you can to ensure you are adhering to social distancing best practices. 
  • If you are going for a bike ride, ride from your place of residence.
    • Do not put your bike on your car or leave your community to ride.
  • Wear a mask or a buff while riding to protect yourself and others. 
  • Practice good hand hygiene at all times.
  • Get your sleep! Your immune system is stronger when you practice healthy sleep habits. Roshon recommends 8-9 hours.
  • Eat healthily. Now is not the time to fast; fasting hinders your immune system. 
    • But keep in mind that it’s important not to overdo it. When you push yourself too hard, you can limit your immune system’s response to a virus.  
  • Do not spit or snot-rocket on rides or around other people walking or biking. Carrying a kerchief or bandanna in your pocket is a good alternative that will mitigate the risk of any spread. 
    • If you have to do so and don’t have bandanna or kerchief, make sure no one else is around you. Check out this article from Bicycling Magazine which dives deeper into the topic. 
  • If you’re in a shelter-in-place or stay-at-home area that prohibits you from riding your bike, it’s important to heed those rules and stay home. Don’t put yourself or your loved ones at risk because you want to go for a ride. For a list of communities with shelter-in-place orders, scroll down to the “What We’re Hearing” section. 
  • Finally, don’t ride risky. This is an especially bad time to be in a bike crash. You don’t want to go to the hospital right now, and doctors don’t want to see you unless they need to, so taking reasonable precautions while riding is especially important right now.

Returning to cycling after a long break? How to return strong | SHEEBES

 

1. FOLLOW THE RULES
2. STAY LOCAL
3. KEEP IT SHORT
4. STAY IN THE SAFE ZONE

BIKEPACKING AMIDST COVID-19

5. GO SOLO OR WITH FAMILY
6. KEEP YOUR DISTANCE
7. HELP PREVENT TRANSMISSION

WHAT OTHERS ARE DOING

Getting Back On The Bike? Watch These Five Videos

Matching Bicycles With Essential Workers

Play Video

From Oregon – Masks, more room, and passing etiquette: The new rules for riding

The deeper we get into this pandemic, the more apparent it becomes that we need a much more radical approach to cycling outside than simply saying “ride alone”.

Oakland, California, to close 74 miles of city streets to cars, inviting walkers, runners and cyclists instead

OAKLAND, Calif.— This Bay Area city will join a growing list of others around the country that are closing streets to cars in favor of increased pedestrian and bicycle traffic during the COVID-19 crisis, an official said Thursday.

“We’ll announce an emergency measure that allows Oakland residents more space to walk, bike and run safely through their neighborhoods, and we’re calling it the Oakland Slow Streets” Alexandria McBride, the city’s chief resilience officer, told a town hall meeting held via Zoom video conference.

McBride said Oakland will open up 74 miles of car-free streets and will begin rolling out the program Saturday.

Other cities, including St. Paul, Minnesota, and Philadelphia, have taken similar measures, and several other U.S. cities are discussing the possibility. By one count, Oakland’s road closure is the largest by far of any American city during the pandemic.